Thomas Mundy Peteson

GSL Videos

Various videos GSL has made over the years!


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Gutzon Borglum's "Wars of America"

11/09/20 - 00:17:11

The full program can be watched here.

On November 9, 2020, Gordon Bond's video was presented as part of the Newark History Society's virtual program, Monumental Newark: Gutzon Borglum’s “Seated Lincoln” and “The Wars of America.” In this video, Bond explores the inspiration, difficulties, and complex legacy of Borglum's massive bronze monument, sitting at the heart of Newark's Military Park.  

Made From My Own Hand : An Introduction to NJ's Folk Grave Marker Tradition

10/03/20 - 00:28:53

Many people appreciate the cultural, historic, and artistic significance of cemeteries and are familiar with the old brownstones and granite monuments. Look beyond these, out in the back, along the fence, or even in the low-lying flood-prone sections and you may very well find collections of homemade markers. These are often made from concrete but can also be metal, wood, or ceramic. Some are simple or crude, but they can also be highly creative.

New Jersey historians Gordon Bond and Stephanie M. Hoagland were curious about such markers they found throughout the state. They noticed they tend to be mostly from the 1910s to 1930s and found in urban cemeteries where European immigrants were buried. They realized these represent an under-appreciated and under-studied aspect of American funerary and folk art traditions history.

In this video, adapted from a talk they give for history and civic groups, they present an introduction to folk grave markers in the Garden State!

William Anderson, Sr. Swears By Duffy's Pure Malt Whiskey!

11/29/16 - 00:02:39

While doing research in old newspapers, it is often too easy to get distracted by other unrelated stories. That's what happened to me recently, when I came across a testimonial from a many in Perth Amboy, NJ man, William Anderson, Sr., to the restorative properties of something called Duffy's Pure Malt Whiskey. This appears in The Washington Times for September 11, 1913. Spotting a Garden State connection, I did some research into who Anderson was and what Duffy's was and discovered an interesting, if tangential story!

Newark's Mount Prospect Park Re-Opening Ceremony

04/15/16 - 00:14:00

Andrew Anderson is the historian at Double Trouble Village State Historic Site at Double Trouble State Park. He is available to speak to your Adult, College, and High School groups most weeks Wednesday through Sunday mornings and early afternoons. Additional days and times may be arranged based on availability.


NEED: Screen, Electric Outlet

BOOKS: None

FEE: $100

TRAVEL: 100

"Votes For Women"

06/10/15 - 00:06:47

Based on this GSL article.


The battle for women's suffrage as it played out in New Jersey included an interesting event involving a "Suffrage Torch" to be carried through the state to raise awareness and support for a state referendum in 1915. Genealogist, author, and speaker, Maureen Wlodarczyk explores this interesting bit of Hudson County, NJ history with a twist at the end. She reads from a chapter in her book, "Jersey! Then...Again." 

"Dr. Oliver P. Brown: Herbal Medicine Practioner" by Maureen Wlodarczyk

03/03/15 - 00:06:15

At the height of the 19th century patent medicine craze, "Doctor" Oliver Phelps Brown of Jersey City, New Jersey, made a small fortune selling bogus concoctions claimed to be able to cure all sorts of ailments and complaints.

Brown is the subject of a chapter in the book by GSL columnist, author, genealogist, and lecturer, Maureen Wlodarczyk, "Jersey! Then...Again." Here Maureen tells the tale of this "very clever conman selling snake-oil and false hopes."

Maureen Wlodarczyk on EBTV's "On the History Trail"

09/30/14 - 00:29:34

Garden State Legacy's genealogy columnist, author, speaker, and professional genealogist Maureen Wlodarczyk was interviewed on East Brunswick TV's show, "On The History Trail" with host Mark Nonestied.

Petty's Run Ribbon Cutting, Trenton, May 14, 2013

06/20/13 - 00:05:59

Petty's Run in Trenton is an important New Jersey historic preservation success story - not only in terms of the historic significance of the site itself (which is considerable), but because of where it is located. Tucked between the State House and the Old Barracks, it became symbolic of the struggle to gain appreciation for our shared history, when it was threatened with being back-filled. The outcry from a variety of quarters ultimately made that idea politically untenable. This is indeed a triumph for all of us, and those involved deserve our congratulations and gratitude. But this must also serve as a reminder that we additionally need to be aware of all the other sites in our state, not so close to the center of the political heart of the Garden State.

The Bold Defenders of Timbuctoo

04/12/13 - 00:06:19

Based on this GSL article.

In December of 1860, Perry Simmons hunkered down in his attic. He had been so bold as to run away from slavery - to "steal himself" as they put it - and settle in an obscure African-American community in South Jersey. There he lived with his family, hoping the remote place would afford protection from the "slave catchers" who sought bounties by returning runaway slaves. But on that night, his luck ran out and a group of men approached. What happened next is the subject of Dennis Rizzo's article in Garden State Legacy's issue issue number 3 in 2009, which has been adapted into this short video documentary.

The Woodbridge Speedway

04/12/13 - 00:10:12

Based on this GSL article.

On Sundays, May through September, between 1927 to 1938, Woodbridge Township, NJ roared as the nation's top auto racers competed at what was called "the world's fastest half-mile racetrack." The late Virginia Troeger told the tale of this track and the daring drivers who raced there in Garden State Legacy magazine number 10 (December 2010) and this article was adapted into this video by GSL publisher, Gordon Bond.

David T. Kenney: Forgotten New Jersey Inventor

03/29/13 - 00:15:38

Based on this GSL article.

What does a plumber from North Plainfield, vacuum cleaners, and Mount St. Mary's Academy in the Watching Hills all have in common?

First Flash?


Join Gordon Bond as he researches the claim that the first outdoor flash photograph was taken in Elizabeth, NJ! You can read the resulting two articles here and here.

First Flash? The Mystery of the Woodrow Wilson Photograph - Part 1

05/30/12 - 00:01:22

Knowing my interest in all things having to do with New Jersey history, my wife gave me a newspaper clipping from the Newark Star Ledger of a photograph showing President Woodrow Wilson in Elizabeth, NJ, May 1, 1913. But what was more is that the original caption claimed it to be the first photograph taken outdoors at night using flash photography. Looking for article material for my online NJ history magazine, www.GardenStateLegacy.com, I decided to see if I could discover the story behind this image - what was Wilson doing in Elizabeth on that date, who were some of the men shown with him, and was this really the New Jersey photographic first it claimed? I decided to create a series of short videos documenting the process of attempting to discover the story behind this interesting image. This is Part 1 and additional videos will be added as things progress.

First Flash? The Mystery of the Woodrow Wilson Photograph - Part 2

05/30/13 - 00:02:28


Knowing my interest in all things having to do with New Jersey history, my wife gave me a newspaper clipping from the Newark Star Ledger of a photograph showing President Woodrow Wilson in Elizabeth, NJ, May 1, 1913. But what was more is that the original caption claimed it to be the first photograph taken outdoors at night using flash photography. Looking for article material for my online NJ history magazine, www.GardenStateLegacy.com, I decided to see if I could discover the story behind this image - what was Wilson doing in Elizabeth on that date, who were some of the men shown with him, and was this really the New Jersey photographic first it claimed? I decided to create a series of short videos documenting the process of attempting to discover the story behind this interesting image. This is Part 2 and additional videos will be added as things progress.

First Flash? The Mystery of the Woodrow Wilson Photograph - Part 3

06/03/12 - 00:02:50

Knowing my interest in all things having to do with New Jersey history, my wife gave me a newspaper clipping from the Newark Star Ledger of a photograph showing President Woodrow Wilson in Elizabeth, NJ, May 1, 1913. But what was more is that the original caption claimed it to be the first photograph taken outdoors at night using flash photography. Looking for article material for my online NJ history magazine, www.GardenStateLegacy.com, I decided to see if I could discover the story behind this image - what was Wilson doing in Elizabeth on that date, who were some of the men shown with him, and was this really the New Jersey photographic first it claimed? I decided to create a series of short videos documenting the process of attempting to discover the story behind this interesting image. This is Part 3 and additional videos will be added as things progress.

First Flash? The Mystery of the Woodrow Wilson Photograph - Part 4

06/11/12 - 00:01:40


Knowing my interest in all things having to do with New Jersey history, my wife gave me a newspaper clipping from the Newark Star Ledger of a photograph showing President Woodrow Wilson in Elizabeth, NJ, May 1, 1913. But what was more is that the original caption claimed it to be the first photograph taken outdoors at night using flash photography. Looking for article material for my online NJ history magazine, www.GardenStateLegacy.com, I decided to see if I could discover the story behind this image - what was Wilson doing in Elizabeth on that date, who were some of the men shown with him, and was this really the New Jersey photographic first it claimed? I decided to create a series of short videos documenting the process of attempting to discover the story behind this interesting image. This is Part 4 and additional videos will be added as things progress.

First Flash? The Mystery of the Woodrow Wilson Photograph - Part 5

06/11/12 - 00:01:46

Knowing my interest in all things having to do with New Jersey history, my wife gave me a newspaper clipping from the Newark Star Ledger of a photograph showing President Woodrow Wilson in Elizabeth, NJ, May 1, 1913. But what was more is that the original caption claimed it to be the first photograph taken outdoors at night using flash photography. Looking for article material for my online NJ history magazine, www.GardenStateLegacy.com, I decided to see if I could discover the story behind this image - what was Wilson doing in Elizabeth on that date, who were some of the men shown with him, and was this really the New Jersey photographic first it claimed? I decided to create a series of short videos documenting the process of attempting to discover the story behind this interesting image. This is Part 5 and additional videos will be added as things progress.

Thomas Mundy Peterson


In 2020, Gordon Bond published a book about Thomas Mundy Peterson, who became the first African American in the nation to cast a ballot under the Fifteenth Amendment when he voted in a Perth Amboy city charter referendum in 1870.

Preserving Petersons Perth Amboy Photograph

04/01/19 - 00:07:07

In 1884, a man in Princeton claimed to have been the first black voter, but an investigation proved Peterson had indeed been first. In honor of this, the City of Perth Amboy presented him with a gold medal on Decoration Day, May 30, 1884. It is thought this photo was made of him shortly after. It is the only time known of when he had his picture taken.  Garden State Legacy Founder and ePublisher, Gordon Bond, put together this short video about the photograph and an important effort to conserve it after finding it had become damaged.

"Citizen Peterson: How Thomas Mundy Peterson Made the Most of His Historic Vote"

09/10/17 - 01:07:15

On March 31, 2017, author and historian Gordon Bond gave a presentation at the Perth Amboy Free Public Library om the occasion of the 147th anniversary of Thomas Mundy Peterson becoming the first African-American to cast a vote under the Fifteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution. He voted in a local government referendum held in the NJ town the day after the Amendment had become law. Bond's presentation talks about his research into the way in which Peterson embraced his newfound role as a citizen in civic life, including little-known areas has has uncovered.

The Woodbridge Train Wreck


In 2017, Gordon Bond published a book about the February 6, 1951 wreck of the Pennsylvania Railroad express passenger rain known as The Broker at Woodbridge, NJ. This remains the deadliest train wreck in New Jersey history.

The Woodbridge Train Wreck

09/14/17 - 00:09:32

This compilation of movie footage shows the aftermath of the wreck of the Pennsylvania Railroad express passenger train known as "The Broker" in Woodbridge, NJ on the evening of February 6, 1951. It remains the deadliest railroad accident in New Jersey history, with 85 killed and hundreds injured. Also included is part of a report recorded live at the scene by WJLK radio of Asbury Park, NJ.

Spring Lake Historical Society Interviews 06/27/18

07/02/18 - 00:19:00

During my presentation at the Spring Lake Historical Society on June 27, 2018, I had the privilege of meeting several people with personal connections to the wreck, including John Ferrante who remembered The Broker going by Avenel; John B. Ryan who was in the second car of The Broker that night; and Michael Tully, son of the couple featured in one of the press photos taken at Perth Amboy General Hospital.

Looking for the Scars of the 1951 Woodbridge Train Wreck

06/20/17 - 00:03:03

Railroad historians John Tuerkeli and Tom Gallo join Gordon Bond, the author of "Man Failure: The Story of New Jersey's Deadliest Train Wreck," to look for the remaining scars of the February 6, 1951 Woodbridge train wreck.

Railroad Historian John Turkeli and Gordon Bond at the NJ State Archives, August 3, 2012

06/20/17 - 00:06:21

The exhibits used by the Pennsylvania Railroad at the investigations into the wreck were deposited at the State Archives of New Jersey, including a collection of accident scene photographs. In 2012, John Turkeli visited the archives with Gordon Bond and shared his insights.

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